Project Overview

SanBernardino2050 encompasses four related planning efforts: updating the General Plan, developing a Downtown Specific Plan, updating the Development Code, and completing an Environmental Impact Report for these efforts. Work on these planning efforts will be done over the next three years.

Project Components

GENERAL PLAN

The General Plan defines a community-driven vision of what our City will look like in 2050 and provides a roadmap to get us there. It establishes long-term goals and policies that will guide our community in realizing our vision for the future.

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DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN

The Downtown Specific Plan will be prepared as an early priority of the planning process and contain a set of focused strategies to transform the Downtown into a vibrant and livable center of community identity and activity. It will include a vision, objectives, and planning principles; land use, mobility, and infrastructure plans; development standards; design guidelines; implementation plan; and an economic development strategy.

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DEVELOPMENT CODE

Updating the Development Code ensures consistency with the General Plan and Downtown Specific Plan and will include a review of the existing administrative procedures, land use zone designations, development and design standards, and an updated zoning map and districts.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL

An environmental review will be conducted as required for each of the primary policy and regulatory documents required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) including the General Plan, 2021-2029 Housing Element, Downtown Specific Plan, and Development Code.  It will include the preparation of technical studies on air quality and greenhouse gases; noise and vibration; biological resources; paleontological resources; cultural resources; and transportation.

Learn more about each component below!

The General Plan defines a community-driven vision of what our City will look like in 2050 and provides a roadmap to get us there. It establishes long-term goals and policies that will guide our community in realizing our vision for the future.

 

The updated General Plan will address all State requirements and will cover the following topics (also called elements):

  • Vision. Defines aspirations for San Bernardino in 2050 and is the foundation for all goals and policies in the General Plan.

  • Land Use. Guides the future development and use of land in San Bernardino through a plan diagram depicting the distribution of all types of land use to be permitted, coupled with standards for their density/intensity and goals, policies, and implementation actions associated with these uses. It will distinguish those areas to be conserved for their existing uses and densities and those in which change and new development are desired.

  • Housing. Identifies current and future housing needs for all income groups and demonstrates how to meet those needs. State law requires that this element be revised every eight years, with the deadline for adoption no later than early 2022. To comply, the 2021-2029 Element will be prepared on an accelerated schedule.

  • Economic Development: Develops a long-term policy framework that supports the City’s objectives for a vital and prosperous residents and businesses, which may address such topics as business retention, attraction, and startups; fiscal vitality; training and education; communications and marketing; tourism; development and redevelopment; and economic development culture.

  • Mobility/Circulation: Includes goals, policies, and programs for a mobility system that supports the land use plan and identified travel needs.  While addressing the traditional mode of travel, the automobile, it will also address transit, bicycling, and pedestrian activity and their interrelationships. Topics may include potential new or improved transit corridors and center locations, traffic calming, signage, maintenance, traffic signal network improvements, or methods to promote active transportation.  

  • Utilities and Infrastructure: Identifies necessary infrastructure improvements to support existing and future land uses. Systems including water, sewerage, stormwater, and energy will be addressed, including sustainable approaches to reduce environmental and climate impacts.

  • Public Services and Facilities:  Defines goals and policies for the provision of schools, community facilities, libraries, cultural facilities, police and fire protection and emergency services to support existing and future populations. Includes desired performance levels and strategies to ensure continued provision of services at these levels.

  • Parks, Recreation, and Trails: Identifies existing and planned parks, community facilities, and trails; assesses deficiencies and opportunity areas; establishes standards for their adequacy and distribution throughout the community and identifies strategies for maintenance and enhancement of these resources.

  • Energy and Water Conservation: Addresses recent legislation for conservation and climate change and establishes standards, and best practices for land development, building design, and infrastructure that promote water and energy conservation.

  • Historic and Archeological Resources: Specifies solutions to protect, preserve, restore, and enhance areas, sites, and structures possessing architectural, historical, archaeological, and/or cultural significance, and to reaffirm their continuing value as resources.

  • Noise: Updates technical components of the noise element, including maps depicting existing and future noise conditions based on the updated land use plan and their mobile and stationary sources and measures to mitigate potential excessive noise levels.

  • Safety and Resilience: The Safety Element and the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan provide the City’s comprehensive strategy to reduce the short-term and long-term potential for harm from various threats to community health and safety, including seismic, geologic, flood, severe weather, and wildfire hazards. This element will also incorporate an assessment of the community’s vulnerability resulting from potential climate change impacts and the community’s projected ability to respond to changing climate condition through short- and long-term strategies for community resilience.

  • Climate Change: The General Plan project team will identify key sources of greenhouse gas emissions sources and goals, policies, and actions that ensure efficient use of natural resources and use of low-carbon, clean, and resilient sources of energy. The General Plan will provide an integrated, sustainability, and equitable approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from City operations, City facilities, and the community across multiple sectors, including transportation, energy, waste, water, wastewater, and other sectors as appropriate.

  • Environmental Justice and Health: Defines policies that address state law and topics of concern to the community, include pollution exposure, public facilities, food access, safe and sanitary homes, and physical activity. This section emphasizes civil engagement in the public decision-making process and prioritizes improvements that address the needs of historically underrepresented communities.

 

 

The Downtown Specific Plan will be prepared as an early priority of the planning process and contain a set of focused strategies to transform the Downtown into a vibrant and livable center of community identity and activity. It will include a vision, objectives, and planning principles; land use,

mobility, and infrastructure plans; development standards; design guidelines; implementation plan; and an economic development strategy.

Downtown Specific Plan area

 
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Updating the Development Code ensures consistency with the General Plan and Downtown Specific Plan and will include a review of the existing administrative procedures, land use zone designations, development and design standards, and an updated zoning map and districts.

 

Environmental review will be conducted as required by law for each of the primary policy and regulatory documents required by the State including the General Plan, 2021-2019 Housing Element; Downtown Specific Plan, and Development Code.  It will include preparation of technical studies on air quality and greenhouse gases; noise and vibration; biological resources; paleontological resources; cultural resources; and transportation.